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Santa Clara, Santa Cruz County, CA June 5, 2012 Election
Measure C
Bonds
West Valley-Mission Community College District

55% Approval Required

Pass: 42,498 / 59.8% Yes votes ...... 28,522 / 40.2% No votes
   41,679 (59.89%) Yes / 27,916 (40.11%) No in Santa Clara County
   819 (57.47%) Yes / 606 (42.53%) No in Santa Cruz County

See Also: Index of all Measures

Results as of June 29 12:53pm, 100.0% of Precincts Reporting (221/221)
  Includes 217/217 Precincts in Santa Clara County as of Jul 3 3:58pm
  Includes 4/4 Precincts in Santa Cruz County as of June 29 12:53pm
Information shown below: Yes/No Meaning | Impartial Analysis | Arguments | Tax Rate Statement | Full Text

To provide affordable education at West Valley and Mission Colleges by updating academic facilities and technology to prepare students for 21st century jobs/transfer to universities, upgrading healthcare, public safety and job-training facilities, and aging buildings for earthquake safety, and acquiring, constructing, repairing and equipping sites, buildings, classrooms and facilities, shall West Valley-Mission Community College District issue $350,000,000 of bonds, at legal rates with citizens' oversight, no money for Sacramento, administrators' salaries or employee pensions?
Bonds - Yes
Bonds - No

Meaning of Voting Yes/No
A YES vote on this measure means:
A "yes" vote is a vote to authorize the issuance and sale of the bonds in the amount of $350 million to be secured by the levy of ad valorem taxes on property located within the district.

A NO vote on this measure means:
A "no" vote is a vote not to authorize the issuance and sale of the bonds in the amount of $350 million to be secured by the levy of ad valorem taxes on property located within the district.

Impartial Analysis from County Counsel
Approval of Measure C does not guarantee that the proposed project or projects in the West Valley-Mission Community College School District that are the subject of bonds under Measure C will be funded beyond the local revenues generated by Measure C. The school district's proposal for the project or projects may assume the receipt of matching state funds, which could be subject to appropriation by the Legislature or approval of a statewide bond measure.

* * * * *

Upon approval of 55% of the votes cast by voters in an election, California law permits school districts to issue bonds, secured by the levy of ad valorem taxes on property within a district, for the purpose of construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation, or replacement of school facilities, including the furnishing and equipping of school facilities, or the acquisition or lease of real property for school facilities.

The Board of Trustees of the West Valley-Mission Community College District proposes issuing bonds in the amount of $350 million. As identified in the measure, bond proceeds would be used to provide affordable education at West Valley and Mission Colleges by updating academic facilities and technology to prepare students for 21st century jobs and transfer to universities, upgrading healthcare, public safety, and job-training facilities, and aging buildings for earthquake safety, and acquiring, constructing, repairing and equipping sites, buildings, classrooms and facilities.

Proceeds of the bonds could not be used for teacher and administrator salaries or other school operating expenses. The District would conduct performance and financial audits, and appoint an independent citizens' oversight committee to ensure bond proceeds are expended as promised and specified.

The District's best estimate of the tax rate to be levied to fund the proposed bond issue is $16.25 per $100,000 of assessed valuation during the first fiscal year after the sale of the first series of bonds and during the first fiscal year after the sale of the last series of bonds. The District's best estimate of the highest tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund the bond issue is $16.25 per $100,000 per fiscal year of assessed valuation.

A "yes" vote is a vote to authorize the issuance and sale of the bonds in the amount of $350 million to be secured by the levy of ad valorem taxes on property located within the district.

A "no" vote is a vote not to authorize the issuance and sale of the bonds in the amount of $350 million to be secured by the levy of ad valorem taxes on property located within the district.

Miguel Marquez
County Counsel

By: /s/Melissa Kiniyalocts

for Susan B. Swain
Lead Deputy County Counsel

  Official Information

Fast Facts about the West Valley-Mission Community College District Bond Measure

West Valley-Mission Board Resolution Calling the Election

Santa Cruz County Voter Pamphlet Information
News and Analysis

Cupertino Patch

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Arguments For Measure C Arguments Against Measure C
As education leaders who also are parents of local students, we ask you to vote "Yes" on West Valley-Mission Community College District's future-oriented construction bond.

Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) are gateways to modern career opportunities. The need for well-trained students in these disciplines will grow in the 2020s, but STEM courses require proper and adequate facilities, including laboratory space, so students can prepare for transfer to four-year universities.

Measure C will enable the Community College District to construct and upgrade needed educational space.

In addition to general education courses, West Valley and Mission Colleges offer high quality Career Technical Education in programs such as Hospitality Management, Administration of Justice, Information Technology and Nursing. Our community must ensure both colleges have adequate space to meet student demand and that classrooms are technologically-efficient, safe and energy modest.

All funds from this bond measure will be overseen in a transparent fashion by your elected Board of Trustees with additional scrutiny of every dollar by an independent Citizens' Oversight Committee. Money only will be used for construction, not for general district operations or administrator salaries.

As Santa Clara County's math and literacy student proficiencies continue to grow, our community will have more and more young people ready for college after high school. Let's join together to ensure their academic success is rewarded with a proper educational environment. Deserving students should have the choice to study close to home and to complete their studies in a timely fashion.

Please join the Santa Clara County School Boards Association, the Chamber of Commerce, teachers, trustees, business leaders, parents and community members in supporting "Yes" on Measure C. Your favorable vote will ensure a bright future of higher education opportunity for today's diligent elementary and middle school students who will begin college in just a few years.

/s/ Paul Fong
California State Assemblymember/College Professor/Council Chair, Asian Americans for Community Involvement

/s/Chris Stampolis
Governing Board Member, West Valley-Mission Community College District

/s/ Anna E. Song
Governing Board Member, Santa Clara County Board of Education

/s/Christine Koltermann
School Board Trustee, Santa Clara Unified School District

/s/Hector Sandoval
President, School Site Council, Bracher Elementary

Rebuttal to Arguments For
The District argument says it needs more educational space. How about a 25 % or 50 % increase in educational space for free instead of for three hundred fifty million dollars? All they need to do is start teaching classes on Fridays or Fridays and Saturdays again, as they used to, instead of the current Monday to Thursday faculty friendly schedule.

  • The District argument says, "Don't worry. The bond money will be spent appropriately because a Citizens Bond Oversight Committee (CBOC) will review expenditures.

  • That's what the District said when they passed the last bond. The CBOC is a bad joke. They are carefully chosen friends of the District.

  • After the last bond passed, the CBOC received two serious complaints: 1. That the money was not being spent on what had been promised. 2. That the District had turned down the winner of its rigorous bid process for managing the entire bond construction program and instead given a sweetheart, no bid contract at higher than market rates to a company eliminated in the first round.

  • The CBOC response: "It's not our job to look into complaints." Then, "If you want us to do anything, put it in writing". Both complaints were put in writing, in detail. The CBOC response: Nothing. Ever. Not even, "Thank you. We received it".

The District did not spend the bond money the way they promised last time. Why do you think this time will be different?

/s/ Jeffrey A. Schwartz
Business Owner/Former 3 Term Elected Trustee, West Valley- Mission Community College District

In 2004, voters approved a $234,000,000 bond measure for the West Valley-Mission Community College District.

  • Now the District is asking for another $350,000,000 bond.

  • The prior bond was prudent and needed. This bond is excessive and unreasonable.

  • Residents will continue to pay for the prior bond for more than twenty years. If your house's tax basis is $850,000, this new bond will cost you $140. per year for the next thirty years in addition to the extra taxes for the prior bond.

  • When asking for approval of the prior bond, the District said nothing about needing more money soon. Last time the District said they had leaky roofs and dysfunctional bathrooms and dilapidated portables needing replacement. The District did not use the money as promised. The forty-year-old portables were not replaced, roofs and bathroom weren't fixed. The District is again complaining about the leaky roofs, roofs that could have been fixed at any time in the last seven years for a fraction of the prior bond proceeds.

  • There is no detailed plan for these bond moneys.

  • On line courses now account for over 20% of all units, and increasing. Why build more buildings the District can't afford to maintain, to serve a decreasing number of on-campus students?

  • For faculty convenience, the District only offers classes Monday - Thursday. They could have a 50% increase in capacity simply by offering Friday and Saturday classes.

  • The District's graduation rates remain poor.

  • The District continues to offer non-essential classes while failing to offer enough sections of English and math to meet student needs.

  • Since the last bond measure, the District was found to have been submitting millions of dollars of false class attendance records for state reimbursement, and was severely fined.

  • Many educational bonds are important and needed. This is not. Please vote No.

/s/ Jeffrey A. Schwartz
Former President, West Valley-Mission Community College District Governing Board

Rebuttal to Arguments Against
Don't be fooled by false political rhetoric--Vote YES on C!

FACT: West Valley - Mission Community College District exercises outstanding accountability over taxpayer dollars, 100% of which were spent on-time, within budget and as promised to taxpayers. That's why Taxpayer Advocates, Chamber of Commerce Leaders, and City Councils all endorse YES on C.

FACT: The Measure C plan was developed with extensive input from students, faculty, college staff, and the community to upgrade/repair aging college buildings - some built in the 1960s-- that need repair/replacement of leaky roofs, heating, cooling, plumbing and electricity systems, among other priorities. View the comprehensive Measure C plan at http://www.wvm.edu.

YES on C ensures our students have access to high-quality, affordable education and job training programs they need in today's tough job market.

YES on C updates educational facilities and technology, ensuring students are prepared for the high demand jobs of the 21st century.

YES on C allows Mission College to accommodate more students in high-demand classes that now have long waiting lists.

Yes on C includes strict fiscal accountability requirements including an Independent Citizens' Oversight Committee, independent annual Financial/Performance Audits, and NO money for pensions or administrators' salaries.

With U.C. and California State University systems becoming so expensive, more students are relying on Mission College and West Valley College. We must invest in our colleges so they can provide our students with the high-quality education and job training programs they might not otherwise receive.

Vote YES on C!

/s/William H. Cilker
Samaritan Medical Center Board of Directors

/s/ Adrienne C. Grey
President, West Valley-Mission Community College District Governing Board

/s/ Dianne Dorian
College Faculty Member and Academic Senate President

/s/ Sergio Gonzalez
Student Body President

/s/ Len Duncan
Chair of the West Valley-Mission Community College District Citizens' Bond Oversight Committee

Tax Rate Statement from Chancellor, West Valley-Mission Community College District
An election will be held in the West Valley-Mission Community College District (the "District") on June 5, 2012, on the question of whether to authorize up to $350,000,000 in bonds to be issued by the District to finance school facilities as described in the ballot measure. If the bonds are approved, the District expects to sell the bonds in three series over time. Principal and interest on the bonds will be paid from taxes levies on the taxable property in the District. The information contained in numbered paragraphs 1 - 3 below is provided in compliance with Sections 9400-9404 of the Elections Code of the State of California. This information is based on the best estimates and projections presently available from official sources, experience within the District and other demonstrable factors.

1. The best estimate of the tax which would be required to be levied to fund this bond issue during the first fiscal year after the sale of the first series of bonds, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is 1.625 per $100 ($16.25 per $100,000) of assessed valuation in fiscal year 2012-13.

2. The best estimate of the tax rate which would be required to be levied to fund this bond issue during the first fiscal year after the sale of the last series of bonds, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is 1.625 per $100 ($16.25 per $100,000) of assessed valuation in fiscal year 2016-17.

3. The best estimate of the highest tax rate which would be required to be levied to fund this bond issue, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, 1.625 per $100 ($16.25 per $100,000) of assessed valuation in fiscal year 2016-17.

Voters should note that the estimated tax rates are based on the ASSESSED VALUE of taxable property on the County's official tax rolls, not on the property's market value. Property owners should consult their own property tax bills to determine their property's assessed value and any applicable tax exemptions.

Attention of all voters is directed to the fact that the foregoing information is based upon the District's projections and estimates only, which is not binding upon the District. The actual tax rates and the years in which they will apply may vary from those presently estimated, due to variations from these estimates in the timing of bond sales, the amount of bonds sold and market interest rates at the time of each sale, and actual assessed valuations over the term of repayment of the bonds. The dates of sale and the amount of bonds sold at any given time will be determined by the District based on its need for construction funds and other factors, including the legal limitations on bonds approved by a 55% vote. The actual interest rates at which the bonds will be sold will depend on the bond market at the time of each sale.

Actual future assessed valuation will depend upon the amount and value of taxable property within the District as determined by the County Assessor in the annual assessment and the equalization process.

Dated: February 7, 2012

/s/ John E. Hendrickson
Chancellor
West Valley-Mission Community College District

Full Text of Measure C
To provide affordable education at West Valley and Mission Colleges by updating academic facilities and technology to prepare students for 21st century jobs/transfer to universities, upgrading healthcare, public safety and job-training facilities, and aging buildings for earthquake safety, and acquiring, constructing, repairing and equipping sites, buildings, classrooms and facilities, shall West Valley-Mission Community College District issue $350,000,000 of bonds, at legal rates with citizens' oversight, no money for Sacramento, administrators' salaries or employee pensions?

Bonds - Yes Bonds - No

PROJECTS

The Board of Trustees of the West Valley-Mission Community College District, to be responsive to the needs of students and the community, evaluated the District's urgent and critical educational needs, including completing essential repairs to aging classrooms and college buildings to today's health and earthquake safety requirements, and providing sufficient classrooms and science labs to offer more job training and workforce development courses and programs to students, facility maintenance, safety and security issues, class size and offerings in key disciplines such as nursing, health sciences, biotechnology, solar and clean technology fields, and information and computer technology, in developing the scope of projects to be funded, as outlined in the West Valley College 2009 Educational & Facilities Master Plan and the Mission College 2009 Education & Facilities Master Plan, both of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety (collectively, the "Master Facilities Plans"). In developing the scope of projects, the faculty, staff and students have prioritized the key health and safety needs so that the most critical needs and the most urgent and basic needs and infrastructure repairs are addressed consistent with community and District priorities. The Board conducted comprehensive evaluations and considered community and District priorities and perspectives in developing the scope of college projects to be funded, as listed in the Master Plans. The Board, faculty and community leaders concluded that if these needs were not addressed now, the problems will only become more pressing and expensive. In approving the Projects, the Board of Trustees determines that the District must:

  • Repair or replace leaky roofs, heating, cooling, plumbing and electrical systems throughout the aging campuses;

  • Update academic facilities and technology to help students prepare for transfer to four-year universities;

  • Update technology and facilities to help students prepare for 21st century jobs;

  • Upgrade earthquake safety for campus facilities and classrooms;

  • Improve access to buildings, classrooms and community facilities for people with disabilities;

  • Invest in energy conservation and water-efficient technologies to reduce operating costs for new and existing facilities;

  • Install and repair fire safety equipment including alarms, smoke detectors, sprinklers, emergency lighting, and fire safety doors.

  • Upgrade utility infrastructure such as electric, sewer, and gas systems - to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy costs.

The Master Facilities Plans are on file and available for review at the District Chancellor's Office and include the types of projects listed below.

MISSION COLLEGE

Basic Maintenance, Repair and Construction Projects To Provide Affordable Access for Students

Goal and Purpose: Many job training and academic facilities at Mission College need basic repair, renovation, or replacement. Addressing these essential maintenance, repair and new construction projects at Mission College will allow it to continue to provide high quality, affordable education to local students:

  • Replace existing plumbing and sewer systems to prevent flooding, water damage and reduce future maintenance costs.

  • Repair, renovate or replace aging classrooms and facilities that lack adequate heating, ventilation, air conditioning, electrical and lighting systems.

  • Upgrade utility infrastructure such as electric, communications, environmental, sewer and gas systems to improve function, control and energy efficiency and to reduce energy costs.

  • Replace aging, outdated maintenance and custodial facilities.

  • Realign campus entry to provide access to a main plaza gathering area and improve essential public safety, install communications and security systems, including public phones and security cameras to ensure a safe environment for students, faculty and staff.

  • Implement ADA accessibility improvements throughout the campus' buildings, classrooms, and other facilities to ensure availability to persons with disabilities.

Academic Facility and Technology Upgrade Projects To Help Student Transfer To Four-Year Universities

Goal and Purpose: Ensuring students are prepared for transfer to University of California or State college systems is a major objective of Mission College. Improvements to academic facilities and technology implementations will allow it to continue preparing students for transfer to four-year colleges or universities:

  • Replace outdated classrooms, laboratories, lecture halls, performing arts spaces, and administrative facilities by constructing new central campus buildings to provide better access to academic support and improve the learning environment.

  • Upgrade and replace existing information technology infrastructure and network systems to improve efficiency and increase capacity; construct an energy efficient, up-to-date Technology Institute Building.

  • Install additional electrical service capacity to improve computer technology and Internet access.

  • Upgrade and expand telecommunications, internet and network connections.

  • Upgrade and replace computers, hardware and software systems.

  • Upgrade and replace classroom instructional equipment and acquire library materials and equipment.

  • Construct new academic buildings for expanded classrooms space to accommodate college transfer eligible classes.

21st Century Job Training and Infrastructure Projects

Goal and Purpose: Mission College provides essential job training and workforce preparation for students of all ages. In today's economic times, these projects will allow the District to continue offering local residents training and education in the nursing, health sciences, biotechnology, and solar and clean energy technology fields, as well as other job training and workforce programs:

  • Upgrade earthquake safety for campus facilities and classrooms.

  • Provide and maintain up-to-date technology, data and communication equipment for job-training programs and facilities.

  • Renovate, repair or replace outdated laboratories, classrooms, physical education facilities, training centers and support facilities.

  • Upgrade and expand telecommunications, Internet and network connections.

  • Upgrade and replace computers, hardware and software systems.

  • Upgrade and replace classroom instructional equipment.

  • Replace or upgrade outdated electrical systems.

  • Upgrade library technology, internet access and research tools.

Energy Efficiency and School Health and Safety Projects

Goal and Purpose: Due to the economy, demands for affordable classes at Mission College are at an all-time high. Hundreds of students have been turned away because classes are overflowing. At the same time, budget cuts have forced a reduction in the number of summer school classes. These projects will help meet current and future demands for affordable, accessible quality education by increasing the enrollment capacity of the College:

Energy Efficiency Returns Savings to the Classroom

  • Install energy management systems and energy efficient systems, including solar power systems, to reduce energy/utility costs and return savings to educational programs.

  • Replace existing window systems with energy efficient systems to reduce costs.

  • Replace outdated heating and ventilation systems.

  • Improve insulation, weather proofing and roofs to reduce costs.

Student Safety

  • Improve access for the disabled.

  • Install and repair fire safety equipment, including alarms, smoke detectors, sprinklers, emergency lighting, and fire safety doors.

  • Inspect for/repair gas pipe leaks, replace broken concrete walks, deteriorated asphalt.

  • Replace/upgrade existing signage, bells and clocks.

  • Install new security systems, such as security (surveillance) cameras, outdoor lighting, fencing, gates and classroom door locks.

  • Replace sewer lines and improve drainage systems to prevent flooding.

  • Upgrade roadway and pedestrian paths for improved safety and access for emergency vehicles, site parking, utilities and grounds.

WEST VALLEY COLLEGE

Academic Facility and Technology Upgrade Projects To Help Student Transfer To Four-Year Universities

Goal and Purpose: Ensuring students are prepared for transfer to University of California or State college systems is a major objective of West Valley College. Improvements to academic facilities and technology implementations will allow it to continue preparing students for transfer to four-year colleges or universities:

  • Replace outdated classrooms, laboratories, lecture halls, performing arts spaces, student support facilities and planetarium, by constructing or expanding campus buildings to provide better access to academic support and improve the learning environment.

  • Upgrade and replace existing information technology infrastructure and network systems to improve efficiency and increase capacity; renovate/expand an energy efficient, up-to-date career and technical education facility.

  • Install additional electrical service capacity to improve computer technology and Internet access.

  • Upgrade and expand telecommunications, internet and network connections.

  • Upgrade and replace computers, hardware and software systems.

  • Upgrade and replace classroom instructional equipment and acquire library materials and equipment.

  • Renovate Learning Resource Center (library) Building to improve efficiencies and enhance student learning.

  • Construct or expand academic buildings (business, career preparation, art, humanities, student services center) for expanded classrooms space to accommodate general education college classes.

Basic Maintenance, Repair and Construction Projects To Provide Affordable Access for Students

Goal and Purpose: Many job training and academic facilities at West Valley College need basic repair, renovation, or replacement. Addressing these essential maintenance, repair and new construction projects at West Valley College will allow it to continue to provide high quality, affordable education to local students:

  • Replace existing plumbing and sewer systems and leaking roofs to prevent flooding and water damage and reduce future maintenance costs.

  • Repair, renovate or replace aging classrooms and facilities, especially those that lack adequate heating, ventilation, air conditioning, electrical and lighting systems.

  • Upgrade utility infrastructure such as electric, communications, environmental, sewer and gas systems to improve function, control and energy efficiency and to reduce energy costs.

  • Implement ADA accessibility improvements throughout the campus' buildings, classrooms, and other facilities to ensure availability to persons with disabilities.

21st Century Job Training and Infrastructure Projects

Goal and Purpose: West Valley College provides essential job training and workforce preparation for students of all ages. In today's economic times, these projects will allow the College to continue offering local residents training and education in the health sciences, paralegal, business and administration of justice fields, as well as other job training and workforce programs:

  • Provide and maintain up-to-date technology, data and communication equipment for job-training programs and facilities.

  • Renovate, repair or replace outdated laboratories, classrooms, business training building, physical education facilities, training centers and support facilities.

  • Upgrade and expand telecommunications, Internet and network connections.

  • Upgrade and replace computers, hardware and software systems.

  • Upgrade and replace classroom instructional equipment.

  • Replace or upgrade outdated electrical systems.

  • Upgrade earthquake safety for campus facilities and classrooms.

  • Upgrade library technology, internet access and research tools.

  • Renovate Administration of Justice Building to improve job training for a career in law enforcement, corrections and security.

Energy Efficiency and School Health and Safety Projects

Goal and Purpose: Due to the economy, demands for affordable classes at West Valley College are at an all-time high. Hundreds of students have been turned away because classes are overflowing. At the same time, budget cuts have forced a reduction in the number of summer school classes. These projects will help meet current and future demands for affordable, accessible quality education by increasing the enrollment capacity of the College:

Energy Efficiency Returns Savings to the Classroom

  • Install energy management systems and energy efficient systems to reduce energy/utility costs and return savings to educational programs.

  • Replace existing window systems with energy efficient systems to reduce costs.

  • Replace outdated heating and ventilation systems.

  • Improve insulation, weather proofing and roofs to reduce costs.

Student Safety

  • Improve access for the disabled.

  • Install and repair fire safety equipment, including alarms, smoke detectors, sprinklers, emergency lighting, and fire safety doors.

  • Inspect for/repair gas pipe leaks, replace broken concrete walks, deteriorated asphalt.

  • Replace/upgrade existing signage, bells and clocks.

  • Install new security systems, such as security (surveillance) cameras, outdoor lighting, fencing, gates and classroom door locks.

  • Replace sewer lines and improve drainage systems to prevent flooding.

  • Upgrade roadway and pedestrian paths/walkways for improved safety and access for emergency vehicles, site parking, utilities and grounds.

The listed projects will be completed as needed. Each project is assumed to include its share of furniture, equipment, architectural, engineering, and similar planning costs, program/project management, staff training expenses and a customary contingency. In addition to the listed projects stated above, the Project List at each of Mission College and West Valley College also includes the acquisition of a variety of instructional, maintenance and operational equipment, including the reduction or retirement of outstanding lease obligations and interim funding incurred to advance fund projects from the Project List, payment of the costs of preparation of all facility planning, facility studies, assessment reviews, facility master plan preparation and updates, environmental studies (including environmental investigation, remediation and monitoring), design and construction documentation, and temporary housing of dislocated college activities caused by construction projects. In addition to the projects listed above, repair, renovation and construction projects may include, but not be limited to, some or all of the following: renovation of student and staff restrooms; landscaping; repair and replacement of heating and ventilation systems; upgrade of facilities for energy efficiencies; repair and replacement of worn-out and leaky roofs, windows, walls doors and drinking fountains; removal of outdated buildings and construction of new classrooms and support buildings; renovation of locker rooms; installation wiring and electrical systems to safely accommodate computers, technology and other electrical devices and needs; library materials; repair and replacement of fire alarms, emergency communications and security systems; upgrading, resurfacing, replacing or relocating of hard courts, fields, turf and irrigation systems; construct or renovate athletic facilities, gym, field lighting, gym/pool; upgrade classrooms; construct new or upgrade existing parking lots or facilities; repair, upgrade and install interior and exterior lighting systems; replace water and sewer lines and other plumbing system; replace outdated security systems. The upgrading of technology infrastructure includes, but is not limited to, computers, LCD projectors, portable interface devices, servers, switches, routers, modules, sound projection systems, laser printers, digital white boards, document projectors, upgrade voice-over-IP, call manager and network security/firewall, and other miscellaneous equipment and software.

The allocation of bond proceeds will be affected by the District's receipt of State matching funds and the final costs of each project. In the absence of State matching funds, which the District will aggressively pursue to reduce the District's share of the costs of the projects, the District will not be able to complete some of the projects listed above. Some projects may be undertaken as joint use projects in cooperation with other local public or non-profit agencies. The budget for each project is an estimate and may be affected by factors beyond the District's control. The final cost of each project will be determined as plans and construction documents are finalized, construction bids are received, construction contracts are awarded and projects are completed. Based on the final costs of each project, certain of the projects described above may be delayed or may not be completed. Demolition of existing facilities and reconstruction of facilities scheduled for repair and upgrade may occur, if the Board determines that such an approach would be more cost-effective in creating more enhanced and operationally efficient campuses. Necessary site preparation/restoration may occur in connection with new construction, renovation or remodeling, or installation or removal of relocatable classrooms, including ingress and egress, removing, replacing, or installing irrigation, utility lines, trees and landscaping, relocating fire access roads, and acquiring any necessary easements, licenses, or rights of way to the property. Proceeds of the bonds may be used to pay or reimburse the District for the cost of District staff when performing work on or necessary and incidental to bond projects. Bond proceeds shall only be expended for the specific purposes identified herein. The District shall create an account into which proceeds of the bonds shall be deposited and comply with the reporting requirements of Government Code 53410.

NO ADMINISTRATOR SALARIES. PROCEEDS FROM THE SALE OF THE BONDS AUTHORIZED BY THIS PROPOSITION SHALL BE USED ONLY FOR THE ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, RECONSTRUCTION, REHABILITATION, OR REPLACEMENT OF SCHOOL FACILITIES, INCLUDING THE FURNISHING AND EQUIPPING OF SCHOOL FACILITIES, AND NOT FOR ANY OTHER PURPOSE, INCLUDING TEACHER AND COLLEGE ADMINISTRATOR SALARIES, PENSIONS AND OTHER OPERATING EXPENSES.

FISCAL ACCOUNTABILITY. THE EXPENDITURE OF BOND MONEY ON THESE PROJECTS IS SUBJECT TO STRINGENT FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS. BY LAW, PERFORMANCE AND FINANCIAL AUDITS WILL BE PERFORMED ANNUALLY, AND ALL BOND EXPENDITURES WILL BE MONITORED BY AN INDEPENDENT CITIZENS' OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE TO ENSURE THAT FUNDS ARE SPENT AS PROMISED AND SPECIFIED. THE CITIZENS' OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE MUST INCLUDE, AMONG OTHERS, REPRESENTATION OF A BONA FIDE TAXPAYERS ASSOCIATION, A BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND A SENIOR CITIZENS ORGANIZATION. NO DISTRICT EMPLOYEES OR VENDORS ARE ALLOWED TO SERVE ON THE CITIZENS' OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE.


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